Planning the publication blog by Abigail Brook-Petty

Following our visits to the Peace Museum and the Liddle collection, on Thursday 20th April we began to plan how our publication will look and discussed what it will contain. The session started with a chat about the images we thought were most relevant and should be included in the publication. This was done by using stickers to mark our favourite images and photographers we had previously learned about. We were then introduced to Andy the designer of our publication and we discussed potentially how the images would look as well as initial ideas for front covers etc.

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Following this discussion Andy showed us a collection of publications he has designed which included interactive books and newspaper like publications. Seeing the wide range of possibilities got us thinking about what we want the publication to achieve as it will be distributed to every secondary school in Bradford. We spent some time discussing ideas taken from publications we had looked at.

After deciding some initial ideas we moved into the meeting room in the library and carried on looking at publications. After a long break and tea and cake we had a discussion session about exactly how we want the publication to look and we wrote down ideas we were interested in on large pieces of paper.

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We discussed that we wanted to keep the publication in keeping with the albums we had seen at the Liddle collection by putting one of the images on the front cover. We also decided that another interactive section could include letters and prints created by the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom printing blocks we found in the peace museum archive. There may also be a mini guide which will be created by New Focus members which explains how to use an archive. Other elements we have decided to put in the, publication include a timeline showing womens journeys through the war. We may also include a map as some of the albums in the archives had images from areas mainly in Europe where nurses we had researched were sent to work. We have also decided that the publication should be bright and colourful to help make the publication interesting and appealing with colours that are relevant for example the colours of nurses uniforms.

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At the end of the meeting we came up with 5 buzzwords about how we want the publication to feel. The words we decided on were welcoming, informative, eye catching, interactive and hand-made. We would like to make the publication feel unique and not mass produced and these words will help us to write the publication brief after we have visited the Imperial War museum archive in May.

Review by Abigail Brook-Petty

This project is supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund ‘Young Roots’ scheme

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Imperial War Museum Digital Archive meeting, Thursday 13th April 2017. Review by Mollie Wiggins

 

Firstly, we met at Impressions Gallery at 2pm and used the facilities available at Bradford Library to look at the online archives at the Imperial War Museum in London. We split into three groups and began to each look at either Florence Flanborough’s work, Mairi Chisholm and Elsie Knocker’s work or Olive Edis’ work. We then each picked a picture and began to answer specific questions on this work.

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We did this for an hour and half and then began to watch some videos we had found on Mairi and Elsie. These videos featured them having a fun time during the war, and even showed them riding motorcycles, as we had learnt that they had previously, before coming nurses, been professional motorcyclists. We also listened to an audio recording of Mari which was very interesting. She talked about her experiences within the First World War alongside her best friend, Elsie, and how she was in a way “being a grouse” (being shot at)and was joking about not being killed during the war. She explained how they never left the ambulance and was just there to help the soldiers but had an inspiring companion to help her during this time. We also listened to an audio recording of Florence Farnborough. She sounded very posh and came from a very wealthy background in Buckinghamshire. She spoke about how she had met a Russian family during the war and wanted to go to their country to explore.

Following this we fed back the information we had all written about within the first half of the session. We found out that Olive Edis photographed woman mainly and her photos were very serious as she chose very powerful subject matter to capture. We looked at an image of woman engineers working on First World War aircrafts, this reflected other sources we had studied before at different archives. From this set of photos, we learnt that her work evolved during the period and she set her mind to taking these photos, and therefore was very inspiring. We then began looking at Mairi Chisholm’s work. She mainly took images of Elsie and vice versa. As a result, all her work was very casually staged and therefore all her photos were very reserved and calm. In one of her images she had climbed a tree and took a gripping image of a 19 foot shell hole, this showed she was very curious and wanted to capture everything about the war she could.

Finally, we looked at Florence Farnborough’s images. We learnt that she had moved to Moscow and become a nursing sister, even teaching Russian children. We looked at a photograph she had taken of soldiers getting their haircut, this showed a part of the soldier’s lifestyle we had never seen before, they also had a pet goat and this showed they were caring. In a way, this photo showed that the soldiers had to adapt their home lifestyles to fit the war lifestyle. Another image we looked at was very graphic, showing a deceased soldier in a trench, this showed what everyday soldiers had to witness and the traumatic events which happened. The images overall showed she was very adventurous and interested in travelling and was interested in helping others rather than focusing on herself.

Review by Mollie Wiggins

This project is supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund ‘Young Roots’ scheme

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